Glossary of Motorsports Analytics Terminology

Base Retention Percentage at Finish (or BRP-F) — Measures the percentage in which a driver and team retain their position going into the final 10 percent of each race. Only races in which the driver and team are running at the finish are considered.

Base Retention Percentage on Start (or BRP-S) — Measures the percentage in which a driver retains position in the inital laps following the start of the race.

Clutch +/- – Measures position retainment and passes of value during green-white-checkered situations. This is a weighted result of a proprietary model. Read as +/-0.000 Clutch +/- (e.g. drivers with a positive Clutch +/- can be expected to hold or gain positions on green-white-checkered attempts; drivers with a negative Clutch +/- can be expected to lose positions).

Crash Frequency – Measures the frequency in which a driver suffers a crash or spin that causes them to lose position. Read as 0.00 Crash Frequency (e.g. a 0.21 Crash Frequency can be understood as a driver crashing 0.21 times per race).

Fringe Contender – A driver earning a PEER of 2.999 to 2.000. This driver is exhibiting the ability to compete for a series championship.

Pass Efficiency – A measure of a driver’s efficiency in navigating through traffic. Above 50 percent efficiency indicates a driver who passes more than he/she is passed, while a mark below 50 percent means a driver is passed more than he/she passes. Subscribers can read more about pass efficiency.

PEER (officially Production in Equal Equipment Rating) – Measures driver production or weighted results that take equipment strength into account. This is a weighted result of a proprietary model. Read as 0.000 PEER (e.g. a driver with a 1.500 PEER is a serviceable driver that can win an occasional race but cannot compete for a championship in an all-equipment-even scenario). Subscribers can read more about the methodology behind the site’s flagship metric.

PEER Forecast – A forecast of a driver’s future PEER. This is a weighed result of a proprietary model. Read in the same manner as PEER.

Position Retention Difference at Finish (or PRD-F) – Measures a team’s percentage increase or decrease in running position in the final 10 percent of laps in races. Read as +/- 0.0 percent PRD-F (e.g. a team with a +3.5 percent PRD, on average, increases their position with 10 percent of a race to go by 3.5 percent).

Position Retention Difference on Start (or PRD-S) – Measures a team’s percentage increase or decrease in running position at the start of a race (usually the first two laps). Read as +/- 0.0 percent PRD-S (e.g. a team with a +3.5 percent PRD-S, on average, increases their position in the intial laps of a race by 3.5 percent).

Prospect Score – Measures a combination of a young driver’s PEER and series serviceability (the number of serviceable drivers among drivers eligible in a series) for the driver’s series of record during a specific timeframe. This is a weighted result of a proprietary model. Read as a Prospect Score of 0.00. The higher a Prospect Score, the more likely a driver is prepared for elite competition.

Replacement Level – A driver earning a PEER of 0.000 or lower. This driver’s PEER can be easily found elsewhere.

Restart Retention Percentage – Measures the percentage in which a driver retains position (by either standing pat or moving forward) on restarts. On MotorsportsAnalytics.com, the first seven rows are accounted for and the percentages are separated into two grooves — the preferred and non-preferred — based on overall single-race retention percentage. Read more about the differences between the two grooves.

Relevance – Measures the percentage in which a driver/team finishes in the top half of fields. Read as 0.00 percent Relevance (e.g. a team with 83.33 percent Relevance has finished in the top half of fields 83.33 percent of the time).

Serious Contender – A driver earning a PEER of 3.999 to 3.000. This driver is exhibiting the ability to compete for a series championship while producing higher finishes than those with a Fringe Contender-level PEER.

Serviceable – A driver earning a PEER of 1.999 to 1.000. This driver can be counted on for an occasional race win.

Terminal Crash Frequency (or TCF) – Measures the frequency in which a driver suffers a crash that causes them to retire from a race. Read as 0.00 TCF (e.g. a 0.10 TCF can be understood as a driver terminally crashing once every 10 races).

Top 15 Efficiency (or T15E) – Measures a driver’s ability to capitalize on running in the top 15 and understands a driver’s aggression or patience in given equipment during races. It is the difference between a driver’s percentage of finishes in the top 15 and the driver’s percentage of total laps run in the top 15. Read as 0.0 percent Top 15 Efficiency. A driver with an overwhelming negative efficiency can be perceived as aggressive and inefficient while in the top 15, while a driver with an overwhelming positive efficiency can be perceived as patient and efficient. A driver with an efficiency of -3.0 percent to +3.0 percent is considered balanced. Meant to interpret the style and efficiency of a driver.

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